HIST - History

HIST 115 First-year Seminar: Routes of Exile-Jews and Muslims

This course will examine exile—both internal and geographic—through contemporary memoirs, let­ters, novels and films. Our primary focus will be on Jews and Muslims living in North Africa and the Middle East. Questions to be asked include: How was community defined? What provided the author with a sense of belonging? What prompts his/her exile? Is the homeland portable? If so, how, and on what terms? Each week we shall explore a different expression of exile. Discussion will include comparisons and contrasts with previous readings.


Instructor

Malino

Prerequisites

None. Open only to first-year students.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 200 Roots of the Western Tradition

In this introductory survey, we will examine how the religious, political, and scientific traditions of western civilization originated in Mesopotamia and Egypt from 3500 B.C.E. and were developed by Greeks and Romans until the Islamic invasions of the seventh century C.E. The course will help students to understand the emergence of polytheism and the great monotheistic religions, the development of democracy and republicanism, and the birth of western science and the scientific method.

Instructor

Rogers

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

REP, HS

HIST 201 The Rise of the West? Europe 1789-2003

This course traces the history of Modern Europe and the idea of "the West" from the French Revolution to the Second Gulf War. We will explore the successes of empire, industry, and technology that underwrote European global domination until World War I and Europe's subsequent financial dependence on the United States. We will reexamine conventional narratives of the rise of Europe and the West, and explore how people experienced 'progress' differently according to geography, class, gender, nationality, and ethnicity. We will also follow the emergence of mass consumption, urbanization, total war, genocide, and decolonization, as well as the developing political idioms of national self-determination, feminism, and human rights, and the scientific idioms of eugenics, psychology, and anthropology.

Instructor

Slobodian

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 203 Out of Many: American History to 1877

An introduction to American life, politics and culture, from the colonial period through the aftermath of the Civil War. Surveys the perspectives of the many peoples converging on North America during this era, and explores the shifting fault lines of "liberty" among them. Because Early America was not inevitably bound toward the creation of the "United States of America," we will ask how such an unlikely thing, in fact, happened. How did a nation emerge from such a diverse array of communities? And how did various peoples come to claim citizenship in this new nation? Emphasis, too, on the issues that convulsed the American colonies and early republic: African slavery, revolutionary politics, immigration, westward expansion, and the coming of the Civil War.

Instructor

Grandjean

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 204 The United States History in the Twentieth Century

The United States' past is one of making and re-making the nation—as a government, a place, and a concept. This course surveys that dynamic process from the post-Reconstruction period through 9/11. Examining the people, practices, and politics behind U.S. nation-building, we will consider questions of how different groups have defined and adopted "American" identities, and how definitions of the nation and citizenship shifted in relations to domestic and global happenings. This will include considering how ideas of gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship intersected within projects of nation building. We will cover topics that include domestic race relations, U.S. imperialism, mass consumption, globalization, and terrorism, and developments such as legalized segregation, the Depression, World Wars I and II, and modern social progressive and conservative movements.

Instructor

Greer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 205 The Making of the Modern World Order

This foundational course in international history explores the evolution of trade, competition, and cultural interaction among the world's diverse communities, from the Mongol conquests of the late-thirteenth century through the end of the twentieth century. Themes include: the centrality of Asia to the earliest global networks of trade and interaction; the rise of European wealth and power in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; empires; imperialism and its impact, the evolution of the nation-state; scientific and industrial revolutions; and 'modernization' and the new patterns of globalization during the late twentieth century. Attention to agents of global integration, including trade, technology, migration, dissemination of ideas, conquest, war, and disease.

Instructor

Matsusaka (Fall), Giersch (Spring)

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 206 From Conquest to Revolution: A History of Colonial Latin America

The "discovery" by Christopher Columbus in 1492 of the "New World" unleashed a process of dramatic changes in what we now call Latin America. Spanning roughly from the fifteenth through the mid-eighteenth centuries, this course examines the ideological underpinnings of the Spanish Conquest, the place of the Americas in a universal Spanish empire, and the role of urban centers in the consolidation of Spanish rule. Emphasis is placed on indigenous societies and the transformation and interactions with Africans and Europeans under colonial rule; the role of Indian labor and African slavery in the colonial economy; the creation, consolidation, and decline of colonial political institutions; and, finally, the role of religion and baroque ritual in the creation of new hybrid colonial cultures and identities.

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 207 Contemporary Problems in Latin American History

In this problem-centered survey of the contemporary history of Latin America we will critique and go beyond the many stereotypes which have inhibited understanding between Anglo and Latin America, cultivating instead a healthy respect for complexity and contradiction. Over the course of the semester we will examine key themes in current history, including the dilemmas of uneven national development in dependent economies; the emergence of anti-imperialism and various forms of political and cultural nationalism; the richness and variety of revolution; ethnic, religious, feminist, literary, artistic, and social movements; the imposing social problems of the sprawling Latin American megalopolis; the political heterodoxies of leftism, populism, authoritarianism, and neoliberalism; the patterns of peace, violence, and the drug trade; the considerable U.S. influence in the region, and finally, transnational migration and globalization.

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 208 Society and Culture in Medieval Europe

This course examines life in medieval Europe c. 750-1250 in all its manifestations: political, religious, social, cultural, and economic. Topics to be studied include the papacy, the political structures of France, Germany, and Italy, monks and monastic culture, religion and spirituality, feudalism, chivalry, courtly love and literature, the crusading movement, intellectual life and theological debates, economic structures and their transformations, and the varied roles of women in medieval life. Students will learn to analyze and interpret primary sources from the period, as well as to evaluate critically historiographical debates related to medieval history.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 209 The British Isles: From Roses to Revolution

By the late seventeenth century, the British Isles were poised to compete for European (and soon global) dominance, yet their unsteady road to power and stability was precarious at every turn. This course will thus explore a period that is often as renowned as it is misunderstood, and whose defining events and personalities have long captured the historical imagination: the Wars of the Roses; King Henry VIII; Queen "Bloody" Mary and Elizabeth; the British Civil War/Puritan Revolution; and the Royal Restoration. While moving across time, we will also focus on the broader socioeconomic, religious, and intellectual changes that defined each monarch's reign. The course centers on England, but integrates Scotland's and Ireland's particular histories of conquest and resistance.

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 211 Bread and Salt: Introduction to Russian Civilization

For centuries, Russians have welcomed visitors with offerings of bread and salt. This introductory course is an earthy immersion in Russian life and culture from the age of Tolstoy to Vladimir Putin. Black bread, dense and pungent, is central to our exploration of Russian drinking, feasting and fasting. We will also consider the patterns of autocratic and communal rule and Russians' current political and commercial uses of portions of their history and civilization. How did and do Russians understand, represent, reinvent and market their past? This question will drive out discussion of national identity in a country that twice—in the course of one semester—lost its empire and struggled (and continues to struggle) to create a new Russian civilization and political culture. 

Instructor

Tumarkin

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 212 Atlantic Revolutions and the Birth of Nations

This course deals with the momentous social, political, and cultural transformations that characterized the American, French, Haitian, and Spanish American Revolutions (the "Atlantic Revolutions"). Straddling the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (the "Age of Revolutions"), these social and political movements constituted a watershed of violent change that ushered in the (many) problems and possibilities of the modern world: the birth of the Nation, nationalism, and democracy, among others. We will seek answers to questions such as: How did nationalism and universalism shape the nature and strategies of revolt and counter-revolution? What was the role of slavery, race, women, religion, and geography in defining citizenship? How did historical writing and revolution work to create the foundational myths of the modern nation?

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 213 Conquest and Crusade in the Medieval Mediterranean

This course examines life in the Mediterranean from the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the fourth and fifth centuries through the Latin Crusades of the Holy Land in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Readings will focus on the various wars and conflicts in the region as well as the political, religious, and social structures of the great Christian and Muslim kingdoms, including the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic caliphates of the Fertile Crescent and North Africa, the Turkish emirates of Egypt and the Near East, and the Latin Crusader States. Attention will also be paid to the cultural and religious diversity of the medieval Mediterranean and the intellectual, literary, and artistic achievements of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish communities.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 214 Medieval Italy

This course provides an overview of Italian history from the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the fifth century through the rise of urban communes in the thirteenth century. Topics of discussion include the birth and development of the Catholic Church and the volatile relationship between popes and emperors, the history of monasticism and various other forms of popular piety as well as the role of heresy and dissent, the diverging histories of the north and the south and the emergence of a multicultural society in southern Italy, and the development and transformation of cities and commerce that made Italy one of the most economically advanced states in Europe in the later medieval period.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 215 Gender and Nation in Latin America

Since their invention in the early nineteenth century, nations and states in Latin America have been conceived of in gendered terms. This has played a key role in producing and reproducing masculine and feminine identities in society. This course examines the powerful relationship between gender and nation in modern Latin America. Topics include patriarchal discourses of state and feminized representations of nation; the national project to define the family as a male-centered nuclear institution; the idealization of motherhood as a national and Christian virtue; the role of military regimes in promoting masculine ideologies; state regulations of sexuality and prostitution; changing definitions of the feminine and masculine in relation to the emergence of "public" and "private" spheres; and struggles over the definition of citizenship and nationality.

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 219 The Jews of Spain and the Lands of Islam

The history of the Jews in Muslim lands from the seventh to the twentieth century. Topics include Muhammed's relations with the Jews of Medina, poets, princes and philosophers in Abbasid Iraq and Muslim Spain, scientists, scholars and translators in Christian Spain, the Inquisition and emergence of a Sephardic diaspora. Twentieth-century focus on the Jewish community of Morocco.

Instructor

Malino

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 220 United States Consumer Culture and Citizenship

We are a nation organized around an ethos of buying things. Throughout the twentieth century, the government, media, big business, and the public increasingly linked politics and consumerism, and the formulation has been a route to empowerment and exclusion. In this course, we study how and why people in the United States theorized about, practiced, and promoted mass material consumption from the turn of the twentieth century into the twenty-first. Topics will include: the rise of consumer culture, the innovations of department stores, malls, freeways, and suburbs, developments in advertising and marketing, the global position of the American consumer in the post-World War II United States, and the political utility of consumption to various agendas, including promoting free enterprise, combating racism, and battling terrorism.

Instructor

Greer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 222 The Barbarian Kingdoms of Early Medieval Europe

This course examines the Barbarian successor states established in the fifth and sixth centuries after the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the west. It will focus primarily on the Frankish kingdom of Gaul, but will also make forays into Lombard Italy, Visigothic Spain, and Vandal North Africa. In particular, the course will look in-depth at the Carolingian empire established c. 800 by Charlemagne, who is often seen as the founder of Europe, and whose empire is often regarded as the precursor of today's European Union. Political, cultural, religious, and economic developments will be given equal time.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 224 Zionism and Irish Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective

Theodore Herzl mused that he would like to be the Charles Stuart Parnell of the Jewish people.  Yitzak Shamir used the code name of Michael (for Michael Collins) during Israel’s War of Independence. Eamon De Valera traveled to Israel to seek advice on the resurrection of the Irish language. Does this dialogue among nationalist leaders speak to a more significant connection between their movements? To answer this question, we shall explore the emergence and evolution of Zionism and Irish nationalism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our focus will include poets, ideologues, and charismatic leaders, immigration, racism, and diaspora. Trends in modern Israel and Ireland will also be explored.


Instructor

Malino

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 228 Swords and Scandals: Ancient History in Films, Documentaries, and Online

Films such as Gladiator, The Passion of the Christ, and 300, documentaries such as The Last Stand of the 300, and internet courses such as Alexander Online perhaps influence how the majority of people now understand antiquity. But are these visual media historically reliable representations of the past? Or do they rather primarily reflect changing artistic and societal concerns? How have the use of digital back-lots, blue screens, and other technical innovations affected how the past is being represented and understood? In this course we will examine the representation of the ancient world in films, documentaries, and online media from the "Sword and Sandal" classics of the past such as Ben-Hur to the present, within the scholarly frameworks of ancient history and modern historiography.

Instructor

Rogers

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 229 Alexander the Great: Psychopath or Philosopher King

Alexander the Great murdered his best friend, married a Bactrian princess, and dressed like Dionysus. He also conquered the known world by the age of 33, fused the eastern and western populations of his empire, and became a god. This course will examine the personality, career, and achievements of the greatest conqueror in Western history against the background of the Hellenistic World.

Instructor

Rogers

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Summer I

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 230 Greek History from the Bronze Age to the Death of Philip II of Macedon

The origins, development, and geographical spread of Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the death of Philip II of Macedon. Greek colonization, the Persian Wars, the Athenian democracy, and the rise of Macedon will be examined in relation to the social, economic, and religious history of the Greek polis.

Instructor

Rogers

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 231 History of Rome

Rome's cultural development from its origins as a small city state in the eighth century B.C.E. to its rule over a vast empire extending from Scotland to Iraq. Topics include the Etruscan influence on the formation of early Rome, the causes of Roman expansion throughout the Mediterranean during the Republic, the Hellenization of Roman society, the urbanization and Romanization of Western Europe, the spread of "mystery" religions, the persecution and expansion of Christianity, and the economy and society of the Empire.

Instructor

Rogers

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 232 The Transformation of the Western World: Europe from 1300-1815

This course will provide a dynamic overview of the intellectual, sociopolitical, and cultural movements and events that defined Europe during its turbulent shift into modernity. From the Black Plague to the French Revolution, we will focus on: the secular humanism of the Renaissance; the Reformation and the resulting Wars of Religion; the emergence of absolutist autocracies and modern liberal states; the radical Enlightenment; feminism, and the dueling ideologies of embryonic capitalism and socialism. By including documents ranging from private diaries and letters to political treatises and popular publications, this course will bring to vivid life a world that is at once foreign and familiar.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 236 The European Enlightenment: A Revolution in Thought, Culture, and Action

The Enlightenment has been alternately demonized and revered for its prominent role in forging Western modernity. Was it the harbinger of modern democracy, secularism, and feminism? Or of ethnocentric racism, sexism, and the terror? This course will examine the works of the most innovative and controversial writers in the canon, including Mary Wollstonecraft, Kant, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Locke, and Diderot. We will also address the forgotten legions of men and women who comprised the international republic of letters, and who frequented the (sometimes respectable, often scandalous) coffeehouses, salons, and secret societies of the eighteenth century. Our discursive focus will be on political hegemony, civil liberties, religious toleration, gender, social development, sexuality, and race.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 240 Cities in Modern Europe

This lecture course explores the uses and visions of the city in Europe since the mid-nineteenth century. The course covers both the history of modern urban planning and the responses to it—the way the city was designed and the way it was lived. We will begin by looking at differing theories of the city: Was it a place of freedom or increased control, especially for socially marginalized groups like women, colonized populations and the poor? Was it an artifact of dominant social forces or a space for individual self-creation? Themes we will cover include colonial urbanism, modernism, fascist city planning, suburbanization, tourism, migration and reclamations of urban space by social movements, squatters and youth subcultures.

Instructor

Slobodian

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 242 Postwar Europe and the Three Germanies

In 1945, Germany's war had left much of Europe in ruins. Yet postwar planners recognized that the continent's strongest economic power and most populous country would have to remain the center of a reconstructed Europe. This course explores the challenges confronting a divided continent after 1945 through the histories of East and West Germany, which faced similar problems, but developed solutions that reflected the differing ideologies of state socialism and capitalism. It compares the relative influence of the U.S. and Soviet "partners," strategies for dealing with the Nazi past and histories of collaboration, and efforts to build consumer culture and domestic consent. It also compares youth revolt, gender politics, immigration, and explores the role of a third, reunified Germany in Europe and the world after 1989.

Instructor

Slobodian

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 243 Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Europe

Issues of gender and sexuality were central to projects of social and political transformation in twentieth-century Europe. Regimes of nationalism, socialism, fascism, and capitalism each provided prescriptive models of "good" and "healthy" gender relationships, making sexuality the frequent and ongoing site for state and scientific intervention. At the same time, the ruptures of two World Wars and the effects of modernization created spaces for unprecedented challenges to sexual mores from below. This course explores the fraught, and occasionally deadly, debates over sexual normalcy in twentieth-century Europe through the topics of eugenics, psychoanalysis, first and second wave feminism, the sexual politics of fascism, and the rise of the permissive society.

Instructor

Slobodian

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 244 History of the American West: Manifest Destiny to Pacific Imperialism

With its sweeping landscapes, grand myths, and oversized egos, the American West has loomed large within U.S. history. Since the nation’s birth, Americans looked toward the horizon and imagined their destinies, a gaze since copied by historians, novelists, and filmmakers. Nevertheless, the history of this vast region is much more fractured and complex. This course explores the West—as an idea and place—from the early nineteenth century through World War I. While we will engage the ways that Americans conjured and conquered the region, we will also look beyond their gaze toward the varied empires, peoples, and forces that created the West. Topics covered include: Northern New Spain and Mexico; American Indians and U.S. expansionism; transcontinental and trans-Pacific trade and (im)migration; race, gender, and identity.


Instructor

Quintana

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 245 The Social History of American Capitalism from Revolution to Empire

There is perhaps no better time than the present to study the history of American capitalism, as political leaders, pundits, bank and business executives, and workers across the world struggle to negotiate a reprieve from our current economic crisis. This course will explore the development of American capitalism from its birth in the mercantile world of imperial Great Britain through the financial ruin of the Great Depression. This course will closely examine the relationship between government, business, and society by engaging key moments in nineteenth-century American economic history: the rise of the corporation, transportation and communication innovations, industrialization, American slavery and commodity production, financial speculation and panics, the development of American banking, immigration policy, and labor relations.

Instructor

Quintana

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 246 Vikings, Icons, Mongols, and Tsars

A multicultural journey through the turbulent waters of medieval and early modern Russia, from the Viking incursions of the ninth century and the entrance of the East Slavs into the splendid and mighty Byzantine world, to the Mongol overlordship of Russia, the rise of Moscow, and the legendary reign of Ivan the Terrible. We move eastward as the Muscovite state conquers the immense reaches of Siberia by the end of the turbulent seventeenth century, when the young and restless Tsar Peter the Great travels to Western Europe to change Russia forever. We will focus on khans, princes, tsars, nobles, peasants and monks; social norms and gender roles; icons and church architecture; and a host of Russian saints and sinners.

Instructor

Tumarkin

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 247 Splendor and Serfdom: Russia Under the Romanovs

An exploration of Imperial Russia over the course of two tumultuous centuries, from the astonishing reign of Peter the Great at the start of the eighteenth century, to the implosion of the Russian monarchy under the unfortunate Nicholas II early in the twentieth, as Russia plunged toward revolution. St. Petersburg—the stunning and ghostly birthplace of Russia's modern history and the symbol of Russia's attempt to impose order on a vast, multiethnic empire—is a focus of this course. We will also emphasize the everyday lives of peasants and nobles; the vision and ideology of autocracy; Russia's brilliant intelligentsia; and the glory of her literary canon.

Instructor

Tumarkin

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 248 The Soviet Union: A Tragic Colossus

The Soviet Union, the most immense empire in the world, hurtled through the twentieth century, shaping major world events. This course will follow the grand, extravagant, and often brutal socialist experiment from its fragile inception in 1917 through the rule of Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev, after which the vast Soviet empire broke apart with astonishing speed. We will contrast utopian constructivist visions of the glorious communist future with Soviet reality. Special emphasis on Soviet political culture, the trauma of the Stalin years and World War II, and the travails of everyday life.

Instructor

Tumarkin

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 249 Cold War Culture and Politics

The Cold War was an era, a culture, and a set of policies defining U.S. domestic and foreign relations. This course examines Cold War politics, culture, and foreign policies in relation to various national developments—including the rise of social movements, changes in city landscapes, and the “birth of cool"—and international events, including the Cuban Missile Crisis and conflicts concerning Vietnam. Bearing on these developments were opportunities and limitations that accompanied ideological struggles between the United States and the Soviet Union, the rise of new cultural industries, and demographic shifts in the U.S. Broad topic areas include: U.S. foreign policies, conformity and deviation along lines of gender, race, and sexuality, and domestic and foreign perceptions of the United States in a Cold War context.


Instructor

Greer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 250 Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

HIST 250H Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

0.5

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

HIST 252 The Twentieth-Century Black Freedom Struggle

As popularly narrated, African Americans' modern freedom struggle is a social movement beginning in the mid-1950s and ending in the late-1960s, characterized by the nonviolent protest of southern blacks and facilitated by sympathetic (non-southern) whites. In this course, we explore the multiple ways—beyond protest and resistance—that blacks in the twentieth-century United States struggled for their rights and equality using resources at their disposal. This exploration will take us out of the South, and consider actors and activities often neglected in the narrations of the struggle. Throughout, we will return to the following questions: What defines a movement? What constitutes civil rights versus black power activity? And, how and why are people and institutions—then and now—invested in particular narratives of the black freedom struggle?

Instructor

Greer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 253 First Peoples: An Introduction to Native American History

An introduction to the history of Native American peoples, from precontact to the present. Through a survey of scholarly works, primary documents, objects, films and Indian autobiographies, students will grapple with enduring questions concerning the Native past. How should we define "Native America"? How interconnected were Native peoples, and when? Can we pinpoint the emergence of "Indian" identity and understand how it developed? This course confronts those questions and other issues in Native American history, through such topics as: the "discovery" of Europe and its effects, cultural and commercial exchange with Europeans, removal, the struggle for the West, the "Indian New Deal," and the Red Power movement of the 1970s. Special attention to the Native northeast.

Instructor

Grandjean

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 256 Brave New Worlds: Colonial American History and Culture

This course considers America's colonial past. It is a bloody but fascinating history, with plenty of twists and turns. We will investigate colonial American culture and ordinary life (including gender, family life, ecology, the material world, religion and magical belief), as well as the struggles experienced by the earliest colonists and the imperial competition that characterized the colonial period. Between 1607 and 1763, a florid variety of cultures bloomed on the North American continent. We will explore these, with an eye toward understanding how the English colonies emerged from very uncertain beginnings to become—by the mid-eighteenth century—the prevailing power on the continent.

Instructor

Grandjean

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 257 Women, Gender, and the Family in American History

This course surveys the interplay between the histories of women and the family in American history from the colonial period through the Progressive Era (seventeenth through early twentieth centuries). Through a focus on the changing history of the family, the course will address gender roles, women's work inside and outside the household, and their changing relation to state authority. It will also consider how the regulation of the family serves to reproduce social differences of race and class.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 260 Pursuits of Happiness: America in the Age of Revolution

Investigates the origins and aftermath of one of the most improbable events in American history: the American Revolution. What pushed colonists to rebel, rather suddenly, against Britain? And what social struggles followed in the war's wake? We will explore the experiences of ordinary Americans, including women and slaves; examine the material culture of Revolutionary America; trace the intellectual histories of the founders; and witness the creation of a national identity and constitution. Those who lived through the rebellion left behind plenty of material: letters; pamphlets; teapots; runaway slave advertisements; diaries. We will consider these and more. Visits to Boston historic sites will take you back in time and space to the besieged, volatile city that led the colonies into war.

Instructor

Grandjean

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 263 South Africa in Historical Perspective

An analysis of the historical background and lasting consequences of apartheid, focusing on the transformation of the African communities in the period of commercial capitalist expansion (1652-1885) and in the industrial era (1885 to the present). Important themes are: the struggle for land and labor; the fate of African peasants, labor migrants, miners and domestic servants; the undermining of the African family; the diverse expressions of African resistance; and the processes which are creating a new, post-apartheid South Africa. The enormous challenges of reversing inequality and resolving conflicts will receive special attention.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 264 The History of Pre-Colonial Africa

Pre-colonial Africa encompasses ancient agrarian kingdoms (such as Egypt and Merowe), city-states on the shores of sea and desert, and "nations without kings," with their own, unique social and political institutions. Students will learn about the material bases of these societies, as well as their social relations and cultural production, all the while familiarizing themselves with the rich array of written, oral, linguistic, and archeological sources available to the historian of Africa. After 1500, in the era of the European expansion, large parts of Africa were incorporated into the Atlantic tropical plantation complex through the slave trade. The enormous impact on Africa of this unprecedented forced migration of Africans to the Americas from 1500 to the 1880s will constitute the concluding theme.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 265 History of Modern Africa

Many of Africa's current characteristics are the legacy of colonial domination. We will therefore first study different kinds of colonies, from those settled by White planters to the "Cinderellas," in which colonial economic intervention was (by comparison) minimal and the struggle for independence less bloody. For the post-independence period, we will focus on the historical roots of such major themes as neocolonialism, economic underdevelopment, ethnic conflict and genocide, HIV/AIDS, and the problems of the African state. However, Africa's enormous natural and human resources, its resilient and youthful population, and its vibrant popular culture—a strong antidote against Afro-pessimism—will help us reflect on the future of this vast continent.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 267 Deep in the Heart: The American South in the Nineteenth Century

Perhaps no other region in the United States conjures up more powerful imagery than the American South—stately mansions with live oak avenues are juxtaposed with the brutal reality of slavery. Yet this same region gave birth to other, perhaps more powerful, cultural legacies—jazz and the blues, the freedom struggle and Jim Crow—a heritage both uniquely Southern and yet deeply American. To better understand this region that has always seemed to stand apart, this course will examine the early history of the American South from the Revolutionary War through the beginning of the twentieth century. Topics covered will include: African American slavery and emancipation, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the spread of evangelical Christianity, Indian Removal, African American culture, and the rise of Jim Crow segregation.

Instructor

Quintana

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 269 Japan, the Great Powers and East Asia, 1853-1993

The history of Japan's international relations from the age of empire through the end of the Cold War. Topics include: imperialism and nationalism in East Asia, diplomacy and military strategy, international economic competition, cultural and "civilizational" conflicts, World War II in East Asia, the U.S.-Japan alliance, and the politics of war memory. Special emphasis on Japan's relations with the United States, China, Russia, and Korea.

Instructor

Matsusaka

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 270 Colonialism, Nationalism, and Decolonization in South Asia

The Mughal Empire in late seventeenth-century India was recognized as one of the richest and strongest powers in the world. Yet by the early nineteenth-century, the British ruled the subcontinent. This course begins by examining the colonization of India. Colonial rule meant important changes to Indian life, spurred by British attempts to create private property, introduce social reforms, and spread English education. However, colonial rule also led to nationalism and efforts to imagine India as a unified nation state. The course considers leaders such as Mohandas Gandhi and Mohammed Ali Jinnah’s struggles against the British, culminating in Independence but also Partition of the subcontinent in 1947. We consider a wide range of sources including films, literature, and primary documents.

Instructor

Rao

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 272 Political Economy of Development in Colonial and Post-Colonial South Asia

In 1947, India was partitioned into India and Pakistan. Since then, these countries have wrestled with issues of governance and development, but colonial rule casts a long shadow over their efforts. This course introduces students to the complex politicoeconomic landscape of the subcontinent by examining how the idea of development changes in modern South Asian history. How are developmental efforts embedded in contexts of politics, society, and culture? How do political systems affect decisions? This course considers these questions by examining themes such as: the colonial state's construction of railway and irrigation networks; Gandhi's critique of industrialization; Nehru's vision of an industrial economy; the challenges posed by Partition and militarization of Pakistan; the Green Revolution; the onset of economic deregulation.

Instructor

Rao

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 274 China, Japan, and Korea in Comparative and Global Perspectives

Overview of each political/cultural community and their interactions from ancient times to 1912. Topics from earlier periods include ancient mytho-histories and archaeological records, the rise of China's Han and Tang empires, selective adaptations of Chinese patterns by indigenous polities and societies in Korea and Japan, commercial and technological revolution in China and its international impact, Mongol "globalization," Japan in the age of the samurai and Korea in the heyday of the yangban. Topics from later periods include the growth of international trade in East Asia and early modern developments in Ming-Qing China, Tokugawa Japan, and Late Choson Korea. Coverage extends through first decade of twentieth century to examine Europe's expansion and the divergent trajectories of modern transformation in each society.

Instructor

Matsusaka

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 275 The Emergence of Ethnic Identities in Modern South Asia

South Asian society has long been represented by rigid systems of hierarchy. Caste, most famously, has been represented as an inexorable determinant of social possibility. Yet, what are the ways in which people actually identify themselves, and to what extent is hierarchical identification a product of South Asia's modern history? This course explores the problems of social and cultural difference in South Asia. How do modern institutions such as the census and electoral politics shape the way in which these problems are perceived today? What are the effects of the introduction of English education? Caste will be the primary form of identity that we explore, but we also consider class, religion and gender in seeking to unravel the complex notion of ethnicity.

Instructor

Rao

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 276 The City in South Asia

South Asian cities are currently undergoing massive demographic and spatial transformations. These cannot be understood without a consideration of both the specific history of South Asia and a broader account of urban change. This course examines these changes in historical perspective and situates urban South Asia within a global context. How did colonial rule transform old cities such as Delhi and Lahore? How were the differing ideologies of India and Pakistan mapped onto new capitals such as Chandigarh and Islamabad? How are ethnic pasts and techno futures reconciled in booming cities such as Bangalore and Mumbai? What are the connections between the urban environment and political mobilization? We consider a range of sources, including scholarly literature, films and short stories.

Instructor

Rao

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 277 China and America: Evolution of a Troubled Relationship

A survey of China's economic, cultural, and political interactions with the United States from 1784 to present with a focus on developments since 1940. Principal themes include: post-imperial China's pursuit of wealth and power, changing international conditions, military strategy, the influence of domestic politics and ideology, and the basic misunderstandings and prejudices that have long plagued this critical relationship. Topics include: trade throughout the centuries; American treatment of Chinese immigrants; World War II and the Chinese Revolution; the Cold War; Taiwan, and the ongoing instability of relations since 1979. Sources include the ever-increasing number of declassified U.S. documents as well as critical materials translated from the Chinese.

Instructor

Giersch

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 278 Reform and Revolution in China, 1800 to the Present

From shattering nineteenth-century rebellions that fragmented the old empire to its emergence as a twenty-first-century superpower, few places have experienced tumult and triumph in the same massive measures as modern China. To understand China today, one must come to terms with this turbulent history. This course surveys China's major cultural, political, social, and economic transformations, including failed reforms under the last dynasty; the revolutions of 1911 and 1949; the rise of the Communist Party and Mao's transformation of society and politics; the remarkable market reforms of recent decades; the contentious issue of Taiwan's democratic transition; and China's ongoing effort to define its position within East Asia and the world.

Instructor

Giersch

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 279 Heresy and Popular Religion in the Middle Ages

This course looks at popular religious beliefs and practices in medieval Europe, including miracles, martyrdom and asceticism, saints and their shrines, pilgrimages, relics, curses, witchcraft, and images of heaven and hell. It seeks to understand popular religion both on its own terms, as well as in relationship to the Church hierarchy. It also examines the basis for religious dissent in the form of both intellectual and social heresies that led to religious repression and the establishment of the Inquisition in the later Middle Ages.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 280 Topics in Chinese Commerce and Business

China’s stunning economic growth and the increasing visibility of transnational businesses run by entrepreneurs of Chinese descent have produced many efforts to explain the successes of “Chinese capitalism” and the “Chinese model.” Central to many arguments are debatable approaches to culture and history. Is there a uniquely Chinese way of doing business? Has mainland China developed a revolutionary new path of economic development? This course engages these debates through influential works on Chinese business and economic history, from the nineteenth century through the reform period (1978 to the present). Topics include corporate governance and the financing of firms; the role of kinship and networking (guanxi); changing political contexts of development; competition with foreign firms; the impact of globalization; and debates over China’s remarkable economic rise.


Instructor

Giersch

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 284 The Middle East in Modern History

This course provides a survey of Middle Eastern history from c.1900 to present, with an emphasis on the Arab Middle East.  It will focus on the historical developments of the period: the demise of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War I; the Armenian genocide; the establishment of European "mandates" in most of the Arab world, and the nationalist struggles for independence that ensued; the establishment of Israel and the expulsion of Palestinians in 1948; the Lebanese Civil War of 1975-1990l the Iranian Islamic Revolution of 1979 and the rise of Islamist political movements elsewhere; the regime of Saddam Hussein; the occupation of Kuwait and the Gulf War of 1990-1991; the failure of the Oslo peace process, Israeli settlements, and the increasing political power of HAMAS and Hizbullah; the war in Iraq; the challenge of a potentially nuclear Iran, and the still unfolding and perhaps misnomered "Arab Spring."

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 290 Morocco: History and Culture (Wintersession in Morocco)

An introduction to Moroccan culture, history, and society through experiential and classroom learning. Students will participate in seminars and attend lectures given by Moroccan faculty at the Center for Cross-Cultural Learning in Rabat. Program themes include: women in private and public life, Berber culture, Islam, Arabic, Morocco's Jewish heritage and history, and the legacy of European cultural rule. Students will travel as a group to the central and southern regions of the country to study historic sites and contemporary life and culture in a variety of rural and urban settings.

Prerequisites

None. Application required.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 293 Changing Gender Constructions in the Modern Middle East

Intertwined with the political history of the modern Middle East are the dramatic cultural and social changes that have shaped how many Middle Easterners live their lives and imagine their futures. This course explores the historical contexts of the changing constructions of femininity and masculinity in different Middle Eastern settings from World War I to the present. Such contexts include nationalist and Islamist movements, economic, ecological, and demographic change, and changing conceptions of modernity and tradition, individual and family, and public and private space, and state violence and civil war. Primary sources will focus on the self-representations of Middle Eastern men and women as they engaged with what they considered the major issues of their times.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 295 Strategy and Diplomacy of the Great Powers

This course examines the history of international politics since the late eighteenth century. Rather than treating one country in depth, it considers many countries in relation to each other over time. It examines how major states of the world have, over the past two centuries, interacted with each other in war and peace. It explores past attempts to create international systems that allow each major power to achieve its objectives without recourse to war. It also looks at relations between the great powers and smaller states, conflicts between colonial powers and anti-colonial movements, and post-colonial developments.

Instructor

Matsusaka

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 298 United States and the Middle East Since World War II

Using primary sources in translation and related readings, the course will critically analyze the programs, leadership, and strategies of protest and reform movements in the modern Middle East and North Africa. Through a selection of case studies (e.g. Algeria, Afghanistan, Egypt) students will develop an understanding of the historical roots, theoretical bases, and social dynamics of these movements and the salience of Islamic ideology and practice in contemporary political and cultural discourses in the region.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Summer II

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 299 U.S. Environmental History

This course examines the relationship between nature and society in American history. The course will consider topics such as the decimation of the bison, the rise of Chicago, the history of natural disasters, and the environmental consequences of war. There are three goals for this course: First, we will examine how humans have interacted with nature over time and how nature, in turn, has shaped human society. Second, we will examine how attitudes toward nature have differed among peoples, places, and times and we will consider how the meanings people give to nature inform their cultural and political activities. Third, we will study how these historical forces have combined to shape the American landscape and the human and natural communities to which it is home. While this course focuses on the past, an important goal is to understand the ways in which history shapes how we understand and value the environment as we do today.

Instructor

Turner (Environmental Studies)

Prerequisites

ES 101, ES 102, or an American history course, or permission of the instructor.

Cross Listed Courses

ES 299

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 301 Seminar. Women of Russia: A Portrait Gallery

An exploration of the tragic, complex, inspiring fate of Russian women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, a period that spans the Russian Empire at its height, the Russian Revolution of 1917, and the Soviet experiment and the era of Russian mail order brides. We will read about Russian peasants, aristocrats, feminists, workers, rev­olutionaries, poets, pilots and prostitutes, among others in our stellar cast of characters. Sources include memoirs, biographies, works of Russian literature, and film.

Instructor

Tumarkin

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 302 Seminar. World War II as Memory and Myth, 1945-2010

This seminar explores the many ways that victors and vanquished, victims and perpetrators, governments, political groups and individuals have remembered, celebrated, commemorated, idealized, condemned, condoned, forgotten, ignored and grappled with the vastly complex history and legacy of World War II in the past half-century. Our primary focus is the war in Europe, including Poland and Russia, although we will also consider the U.S. and Japan. We will investigate the construction of individual and collective memories about World War II and the creation and subsequent transformation of set myths about the war experience. In addition to books and articles, sources will include memoirs, primary documents, and films. We will also study the impact of war memories on international relations and analyze the "monumental politics" of war memorials.

Instructor

Tumarkin

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 307 Seminar. Religious Change and the Emergence of Modernity in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1800

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, important religious, social, and intellectual transformations in Western Europe created two distinctly new and competing visions of modernity: an empirically-based rational religion and a faith-based evangelicalism. The legacy of their creation and conflict, both between one another and with the established traditionalists and insurgent atheists, reverberate to this day. In this seminar, we will explore: the relationship between science and religion; the effects of rising pluralism at home and global exploration overseas; witchcraft; the secularization and commercialization of daily life; the separation of church and state; and the formation of the first supra-national identities that transcended traditional religious boundaries. These issues raise broader questions about the origins of cultural change, as well as the nature of modernity itself.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 312 Seminar. Understanding Race in the United States, 1776-1918

This seminar explores the history of race from the American Revolution through the First World War. In this seminar we will explore what race means in the United States by examining the varied ways that it has shaped—and was shaped by—key moments in nineteenth century American history. Topics covered will include: slavery, the conquest of the American West, immigration, citizenship and the nation-state, Social Darwinism, the Great Migration, and American imperialism. Throughout the course we will seek to understand race in the United States by exploring the following questions: What is "race"? If it is but a concept or idea, how and why has it affected so many lives and dictated so much of our past?

Instructor

Quintana

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in History and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 319 Seminar. Fear and Violence in Early America

This seminar explores the terrors that stalked the inhabitants of colonial and early national America. How did early Americans describe their fears? What did they find frightening? And what roles did fear and violence play in shaping American society? In this seminar, we will first explore the language and psychology of fear, and then study the many ways that terror intruded on early American lives. Topics include: the role of terror in early American warfare; fear of the supernatural; domestic violence and murder; the specter of slave rebellion; and fear and violence as entertainment in public executions and in early American literature.

Instructor

Grandjean

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 320 Seminar. The Hand that Feeds: A History of American Food

This seminar investigates the place of food in American history and culture, from reputed cannibalism in the American colonies to the rise of fast food in the twentieth century. Through selected episodes and commodities, we will explore the role of taste, competition for food, and capitalism in recasting American lives and identities. Topics include: colonial hunger and violence; the development of taste and "refined" eating; the role of food in defining race, class, and regional culture; the rise of mass production and its environmental effects, and the reshaping of American bodies. In following the evolution of American food ways, we will visit eighteenth-century coffeehouses, antebellum slave quarters, campfires of the American West, the slaughterhouses of the Chicago meat market—and, of course—McDonald's.

Instructor

Grandjean

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 328 Seminar. Anti-Semitism in Historical Perspective

Historians often refer to anti-Semitism as the "Longest Hatred." What accounts for this obsession? Is the anti-Semitism of medieval Europe that of Nazi Germany? These questions will inform our examination of pre-Christian anti-Semitism, the evolving attitudes of Christianity and Islam, the ambiguous legacy of the Enlightenment and the impact of revolution, modernization and nationalism. Sources include Church documents, medieval accounts, nineteenth- and twentieth-century memoirs and contemporary films.

Instructor

Malino

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 329 Alexander the Great: Psychopath or Philosopher King

Alexander the Great murdered his best friend, married a Bactrian princess, and dressed like Dionysus. He also conquered the known world by the age of 33, fused the eastern and western populations of his empire, and became a god. This course will examine the personality, career, and achievements of the greatest conqueror in Western history against the background of the Hellenistic world.

Instructor

Rogers

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Summer I

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 330 Seminar. Revolution and Rebellion in Twelfth-Century European Society

This course will examine the revolutionary changes that occurred in all facets of life in twelfth-century Europe. The twelfth century represents one of the most important eras of European history, characterized by many historians as the period that gave birth to Europe as both idea and place. It was a time of economic growth, religious reformation, political and legal reorganization, cultural flowering, intellectual innovation, and outward expansion. Yet the twelfth century had a dark side, too. Crusades and colonization, heresy and religious disputes, town uprisings and mob violence also marked the century. Students will study the internal changes to European society as well as the expansion of Europe into the Mediterranean and beyond, paying close attention to the key people behind the transformations.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 333 Seminar. Savage Exhibitions in Nineteenth-Century Europe

Modern ideas of race and the "normal" crystallized in nineteenth-century Europe around the widespread exhibition and study of people presented as "savages." This seminar explores how performers from Africa, Asia and the Americas linked the worlds of mass culture, anthropology, medicine and empire, titillating spectators and stoking fantasies of colonial expansion while supposedly providing evidence of the evolution (and potential devolution) of the human races. We will look at scholarly work on the significance of ethnic performers in histories of science, museology, disability, mass consumption and cross-cultural encounter while also exploring recent attempts to locate their lives in postcolonial memory through art practice, biography, documentary and the repatriation of remains.

Instructor

Slobodian

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 334 Seminar. World Economic Orders, 1918-2008

The idea of the “world economy” as a single, interconnected entity only entered widespread discussion in Europe and North America after World War I. This course explores the diverse ways of imagining and ordering the world economy since then and what Europe’s place has been within it, from imperial economies to national economies to a suppos­edly “globalized” economy to recent tilts of the European Union away from the United States and toward China and Russia. We will see how ideas such as development, modernization and global­ization have dictated falsely universal models, but have also served as emancipatory idioms for previ­ously marginalized individuals and populations. We will demystify economic arguments and learn to study economic texts for their content, but also as political and cultural documents.

Instructor

Slobodian

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 340 Seeing Black: African Americans and United States Visual Culture

This course explores black Americans' relationship to visual culture in the twentieth-century United States. We will examine how blacks have produced, used, and appeared in the visual media of news, entertainment, and marketing industries, and evaluate the significance of their representation to both black and non-black political and social agendas. Areas of inquiry will include the intersections between U.S. visual culture and race relations, African Americans' use of visual culture as a means of self- and group-expression, and the state's use of black media images. This exploration will take us through a study of Jim Crow politics, black migrations and artistic movement, U.S. foreign relations and conflicts, and the development of marketing and advertising. 

Instructor

Greer

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 346 Seminar. The Japanese Empire in East Asia, 1879-1951

This seminar explores the history of the Japanese empire in East Asia beginning with the annexation of the Ryukyu Islands (today, Okinawa Prefecture) to the evacuation of occupied territories after Japan's defeat in the Second World War. Issues to be examined include: the driving forces behind Japanese expansionism; the colonial experience in Taiwan and Korea; informal empire in China (emphasizing the Northeast); and the immediate aftermath of Japan's imperial collapse. Readings include monographs, essay collections, journal articles, and some translated primary sources. A 25-page research paper is expected. Some background in modern East Asian history or the history of international relations, in addition to or as part of the prerequisite below, is recommended.

Instructor

Matsusaka

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 347 Seminar. Meiji Japan and the Rise of the East Asian Modern 1868-1912

Japan was the first Asian country to succeed in reproducing the twin pillars of nation-state and industrial economy sustaining nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Western modernity. This seminar takes a close look at Japan in the Meiji era (1868-1912) with emphasis on the development of innovative and adaptive strategies, cultural as well as social, political and economic, for nation-building and “boot strap” industrialization. Although this achievement owed much to a reverse-engineering of the Western “miracle,” it also drew heavily upon indigenous cultural and institutional resources. The result was a new, “East Asian modern” that would have profound influence on the region as a whole as well as twentieth-century Japan. Readings include unpublished primary sources in translation. 25-page research paper required.

Instructor

Matsusaka

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 350 Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

HIST 350H Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

0.5

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

HIST 360 Senior Thesis Research

Prerequisites

By permission of the department

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

HIST 365 Seminar. Research in African History

This seminar is organized around four broad and overlapping themes of recent African historiography relevant to the period 1960 to the present. In this period, African societies tried to overcome the legacies of colonial rule, and to fashion national identities and establish nation-states. However, due to external and internal causes, the successes of the 1960s and 1970s began to falter in the 1980s and 1990s—in many cases leading to violence in the form of civil and other wars. This seminar focuses on African expressions—the fancy word is "mediations"—of these historical changes, with a particular emphasis on popular culture broadly construed, i.e., including a wide range of media from the writing of history and journalism, to literary representations of history, and the popular arts such as popular song and television programs. The four central themes of the seminar are: colonialism, nationalism, and modernity; women and gender; the historical roots of modern conflicts; and popular culture broadly construed. Students will be encouraged to work with primary sources.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 369 Seminar. History, Identity, and Civil War in the Sudan

The deeper causes of the recent civil wars in the Sudan lie in the complex processes of state-formation that have placed different groups of Sudanese in a differential relationship to power and have produced divisive class, ethnic, and racial identities. Themes will include the history of slavery, the rise of an "Arab" middle class in the northern Nile valley, colonial policies, the first civil war between North and South that erupted at independence in 1956, the missed opportunities of the first decades of independence, and the rise of an Islamist oil state in the 1980s, which led to renewed civil war with the South and, since 2003, to war and humanitarian disaster in Darfur.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 370 Senior Thesis

Prerequisites

HIST 360 and permission of the department.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

HIST 371 Seminar. Chinese Frontier Experience, 1600 to the Present

Since the early twentieth century, Chinese leaders have wrestled with the task of integrating large, ethnically diverse populations into a unified, multiethnic nation state. This task's difficulty is periodically revealed when places such as Tibet erupt into violence, as in March 2008. This course provides historical and theoretical approaches to understand the origins and implications of China's diversity. Recent pioneering research allows our class to investigate seventeenth and eighteenth-century histories of conquest that brought the Northeast (Manchuria), Taiwan, Mongolia, Xinjiang, and Tibet under Beijing's authority. These histories provide the foundation for exploring vexing modern issues, including the development of ethnic identities in China, efforts at nation-building and economic development in the frontiers, the internationalization of the Tibet problem, and the place of Islam in China.

Instructor

Giersch

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 372 Seminar. Chinese Nationalism and Identity in the Modern World

China’s emer­gence as a great power is of vital importance, but recent violence in Xinjiang and international disputes with neighbor’s over China’s claims to the South Sea raise questions about how Chinese envision their multiethnic nation and its place in the world. This course places these questions in historical context by examining the evolution of modern China’s national and ethnic identities. Topics include: the birth of Chinese nationalism; revolutionary nationalism under the Communists; struggles over women’s place in the nation; propaganda, popular culture, and nationalism; nationalism and foreign policy; and alternative visions, including Tibetan and Uyghur identities.


Instructor

Giersch

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in History and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 375 Seminar. Empire and Modernity: The Rise and Fall of Spanish World Power

This course traces the rise and fall of the first modern European Empire, the Spanish Empire. This first global empire ca. 1500 ruled over parts of Europe, Africa, the Americas, and Asia. This course provides an historical understanding of early modern ideologies, the institutions and the cultural practices that enabled Spain to rule over such vast territories. To this end we will examine the medieval precedents of early modern imperialism; theories of empire and monarchy; ideologies of conquest and colonization; theories of modernity and empire; models of conquest and colonial exploitation; the role of race and slavery in empire building abroad and at home; the various ways in which the "conquered' colonized Europe and Europeans and the long term consequences of these exchanges.

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 377 Seminar. The City in Latin America

Urbanity has long been central to Latin American cultures. This seminar examines the historical development of Latin American cities from the Roman principles governing the grid pattern imposed by the Spanish in the sixteenth century through the development of the twentieth-century, post-modern megalopolis. The seminar's three main objectives are: to develop a theoretical framework within which to analyze and interpret the history, and historical study of, Latin American cities; to provide a basic overview of the historical development of cities in the context of Latin American law, society, and culture; and to subject to critical analysis some of the theoretical "models" (i.e., Baroque, Classical, Dependency, Modernism, and so on) developed to interpret the evolution and workings of Latin American cities.

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 378 Seminar. Women and Social Movements in Latin America

This seminar examines the historical development of women's movements in Latin America from the nineteenth century through the twentieth century. We will examine the local political and ideological events that shaped women's movements and feminism(s) in the region. Topics include: women's early claims to equal education and the development of the ideologies of "women's rights" and social motherhood around 1900; women in democracy and the search for social justice from the 1930s—1950s; women's role in revolutions and counter-revolutions from the late-1950s through the 1970s; the advent of international feminism in the context of national liberation and re-democratization after 1974, and neoliberalism and globalization.

Instructor

Osorio

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 379 Heresy and Popular Religion in the Middle Ages

This course looks at popular religious beliefs and practices in medieval Europe, including miracles, martyrdom and asceticism, saints and their shrines, pilgrimages, relics, curses, witchcraft, and images of heaven and hell. It seeks to understand popular religion both on its own terms, as well as in relationship to the Church hierarchy. It also examines the basis for religious dissent in the form of both intellectual and social heresies that led to religious repression and the establishment of the Inquisition in the later Middle Ages.

Instructor

Ramseyer

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 382 Seminar. Gandhi, Nehru, and Ambedkar: The Making of Modern India

The creation of the world's largest democracy brought powerful ideas into contact and conflict: the overthrow of colonial rule through a philosophy of nonviolence; the desire to industrialize rapidly; and the quest to end centuries of caste discrimination. This seminar explores the key ideas that shaped modern India through the lives of three extraordinary individuals. How did Gandhi's experiments with food and sex affect his vision of India? How did Nehru's understanding of world history structure his program of industrialization? How did Ambedkar's untouchable upbringing shape his agenda? Could Gandhi's nonviolent agenda be sustained? Could an India based on individual transformation also annihilate caste? We engage extensively with primary sources such as autobiographies, writings, and speeches, as well as scholarly accounts and films.

Instructor

Rao

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 383 Seminar. 1947: Partition in History and Memory in South Asia

In the years leading to 1947, nationalist activism against the British and tensions between Hindus and Muslims escalated in the Indian subcontinent. This culminated in Partition and the emergence of the nations of India and Pakistan. Independence was marred, however, by the bloodshed accompanying the mass movements of Muslims into Pakistan and Hindus into India. What were the factors leading to this juxtaposition of triumphal Independence with shameful Partition? How have memories of Partition continued to affect powerfully politics and culture in the subcontinent? This seminar investigates such questions using a wide variety of materials, including: novels, such as Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children and Bapsi Sidhwa's Cracking India; feature films, such as Deepa Mehta's 1947; and documentary films, such as Sabiha Sumar's Silent Waters.

Instructor

Rao

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

HS

HIST 395 International History Seminar

Topic for 2012-13: Readings in the Histories of Ethnic and Religious Violence

A crucial aspect of contemporary international history is the large-scale ethnic and religious violence that has marked recent civil wars throughout the world, from former Yugoslavia to Sierra Leone, and from Israel to Sri Lanka and Tibet. Though such violence is often labeled ethnic or religious, its causes are much broader. A conceptual unbundling of casual strands (diachronic and synchronic) can bring into focus different ways of dealing with the legacy of violence. Approaching primary sources through the lens of a range of conceptual and theoretical readings, student research will focus on a case study and reflect on ways in which societies may move from such violence.

Instructor

Kapteijns

Prerequisites

Normally open to juniors and seniors who have taken a 200-level unit in history and/or a 200-level unit in a relevant area/subject and permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

HS
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