PSYC - Psychology

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to some of the major subfields of psychology, such as developmental, personality, abnormal, clinical, physiological, cognitive, cultural, and social psychology. Students will explore various theoretical perspectives and research methods used by psychologists to study the origins and variations in human behavior.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

None

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring, Summer II

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 205 Statistics

The application of statistical techniques to the analysis of psychological experimental and survey data. Major emphasis on the understanding of statistics found in published research and as preparation for the student's own research in more advanced courses.

Instructor

Cheek, Genero, Hennessey

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, NEUR 100, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken or are taking ECON 103/SOC 190, MATH 101, MATH 101Z, POL 199, or QR 180 except for psychology and neuroscience majors, with permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring, Summer I

Degree Requirements

SBA, QRF

PSYC 207 Developmental Psychology

Behavior and psychological development in infancy and childhood. An examination of theory and research pertaining to personality, social, and cognitive development. Lecture, discussion, demonstration, and observation of children. Observations at the Child Study Center required.

Instructor

Gleason, Pyers

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 208 Adolescence

Survey of contemporary theories and research in the psychology of adolescents. Topics will include the physical, cognitive, social, and personality development of adolescents.

Instructor

Fay

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 210 Social Psychology

The individual's behavior as it is influenced by other people and the social situation. Study of social influence, interpersonal perception, social evaluation, and various forms of social interaction.

Instructor

Bahns

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 212 Personality

A comparison of major ways of conceiving and studying personality, including the work of Freud, Jung, behaviorists, humanists, and social learning theorists. Introduction to major debates and research findings in contemporary personality psychology.

Instructor

Cheek, Norem

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 213 Abnormal Psychology

An examination of major psychological disorders with special emphasis on phenomenology. Behavioral treatment of anxiety-based disorders, cognitive treatment of depression, psychoanalytic therapy of personality disorders, and biochemical treatment of schizophrenia will receive special attention. Other models of psychopathology will also be discussed.

Instructor

Theran, Wink

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 214 Evolution and Human Behavior

Evolutionary Psychology is the scientific study of human nature as shaped by natural selection. It is grounded in evolutionary biology and the psychological sciences with connections to disciplines ranging from neuroscience to anthropology and economics. Topics covered will include adaptive solutions to major life challenges including survival, mating, family relations, and group living (e.g., cooperation, aggression, and status).

Instructor

Lucas (Spring), Prokosch (Fall)

Prerequisites

PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Cross Listed Courses

CLSC 214

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 215 Memory

Introduction to the study of human memory. Examines processes underlying encoding, storage, and retrieval of information. Will review theoretical models focusing on distinctions between different forms of memory, including short-term and long-term memory, implicit and explicit memory, episodic and semantic memory. Factors contributing to forgetting and distortion of memory will also be discussed.

Instructor

Keane

Prerequisites

PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 216 Psychology of Language

Introduction to the study of the psychological processes underlying language ability. Topics covered will include the biological and evolutionary foundations of language, child and adult language acquisition, reading, and sound, word, and sentence processing. We will also consider whether language is unique to humans, whether it is innate, and the degree to which language influences thought.

Instructor

Lucas

Prerequisites

PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Cross Listed Courses

CLSC 216

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 217 Cognition

Cognitive psychology is the study of the capabilities and limitations of the human mind when viewed as a system for processing information. An examination of basic issues and research in cognition focusing on attention, pattern recognition, memory, language, and decision-making.

Instructor

Keane

Prerequisites

PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 218 Sensation and Perception

In a split-second, a curling of lips across a crowded room is registered by one's eyes and translated effortlessly into a vividly three-dimensional, full-color perception of a baby's smile. This and other sensory and perceptual feats, unmatched by any computer, are this course's focus. Topics include consciousness, attention and inattention, perceptual learning and development, visual memory, faces, 3D depth, color, motion, and brain bases of sensation/attention/perception. Emphasis is given to abnormal and illusory perception, such as that resulting from brain damage/stimulation or artistic sleight of hand. This course shows that our perception, far from being a "copy" of the outside world, incorporates many predictions and educated guesses. Frequent in-class demonstrations will provide insights into course concepts.

Prerequisites

PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 219 Biological Psychology

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Topics include structure and function of the nervous system, sensory processing, sleep, reproductive behavior, language, and mental disorders.

Instructor

Deveney

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP credit, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken NEUR 200.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 221 Narrative Psychology

An examination of the scientific study of humans' approach to meaning-making through the telling of personal stories. This course will include consideration of the ways in which we create meaning out of our experiences with a special emphasis on identity development, drawing on scientific research from personality, developmental, and clinical psychology.

Instructor

Adler

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP score of 5, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 245 Cultural Psychology

Examines the effect of cultural differences on identity and psychological functioning by comparing normative behavioral and psychological tendencies associated with membership in diverse cultural groups: East Asian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, African American, Latino, American Indian, and working- and middle-class contexts within the United States. Topics include: self, agency, motivation, cognition, emotion, development, hierarchy, relationships, and physical and mental health.

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP credit, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 248 Psychology of Teaching, Learning, and Motivation

The psychology of preschool, primary, secondary, and college education. Investigation of the many contributions of psychology to both educational theory and practice. Topics include student development in the cognitive, social, and emotional realms; assessment of student variability and performance; interpretation and evaluation of standardized tests and measurements; classroom management; teaching style; tracking and ability grouping; motivation; and teacher effectiveness.

Instructor

Hennessey

Prerequisites

PSYC 101, AP credit, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 250 Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

PSYC 250H Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

0.5

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

PSYC 299 Practicum in Psychology

Participation in a structured learning experience in an approved field setting under faculty supervision. Does not count toward the minimum major in psychology.

Instructor

Staff

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor. Two units above the 100 level that are most appropriate to the field setting as determined by the faculty supervisor (excluding PSYC 205).

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

PSYC 300-01-S Seminar. Topics in Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences

Topic for 2013-14: How We Choose

Every day we make many choices. Some of these choices are trivial, but some can have profound effects on our lives. In this interdisciplinary course, we will investigate how individuals make choices, examining processes of decision-making that are often emotional and irrational. Topics include biases that lead to poor choices, loss aversion, sunk costs, risk taking, impulsiveness, moral choice, and group decision-making. 

Instructor

Lucas (Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences)

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken one of PSYC 214, PSYC 215, CLSC/PSYC 216, PSYC 217, PSYC 218, PSYC 219, LING 114, PHIL 215, or CS 111, or permission of the instructor.

Cross Listed Courses

CLSC 300-01-S

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 301 Cooperation and Competition

According to traditional models of rationality, rational agents should act in ways that will maximize their self-interest. And the study of evolution teaches us that individuals are in competition for survival. Nonetheless, we have all experienced acts of apparent selflessness, and societies could not function without cooperation among their members. How, then, can cooperative and selfless behaviors be explained? In this course evidence and theories from the psychological, economic, and neurobiological literatures will be examined. Cross-cultural, developmental, and cross-species differences will be explored as will the evolutionary origins of cooperation and competition and the role of cooperation in language.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken one of 214-219 (PSYC 214, PSYC 215, PSYC 216, PSYC 217, PSYC 218, PSYC 219), LING 114, PHIL 215, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of PSYC 300/CLSC 300.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 304R Research Methods in Evolution and Human Behavior

An introduction to research methods appropriate to an evolutionary approach to the study of human nature. Student projects investigate topics across diverse areas of psychology, focusing on the psychological processes that our ancestors evolved to cope with survival and reproductive challenges. Possible topics include cooperative behavior, mate choice, adaptive aspects of language, and gender differences in cognition. Group projects with some individual exercises. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students.

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and one of the following: PSYC 212, PSYC 214, PSYC 215, PSYC 216, PSYC 217, PSYC 218 or PSYC 219.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 305 Seminar. Advanced Statistical Methods and SPSS

Building on introductory statistical concepts and data analysis applications, this course provides an in-depth understanding of hypothesis testing and probability for use in psychological quantitative research. Topics include factorial analysis of variance, correlation, regression, and basic psychometric techniques.

Instructor

Genero

Prerequisites

PSYC 205

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA, QRF

PSYC 306R Research Methods in Developmental Psychology and the School Experience

An introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of human development in teaching and learning settings from preschool through college. Individual and group projects. Laboratory. Each session typically limited to 10 students. Observations at the Child Study Center and other classroom locations required.

Instructor

Hennessey

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and PSYC 207 or PSYC 248.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 307R Research Methods in Developmental Psychology

An introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of human development. Individual and group projects. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students. Observations at the Child Study Center required.

Instructor

Pyers

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and PSYC 207.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 308 Systems of Psychotherapy

This course examines theory, research, and practice in three schools of psychotherapy: psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and humanistic. Topics to be covered include underlying assumptions of normalcy/pathology, theories of change, methods/techniques, and relationship between therapist and client.

Instructor

Wink

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 310R Research Methods in Social Psychology

An introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of social psychology. Individual and group projects on selected topics. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students.

Instructor

Bahns

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and PSYC 210.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 312R Research Methods in Personality Psychology

An introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of personality psychology. Student projects investigate individual and group differences in personality traits, values, goals, and dimensions of self-concept. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students.

Instructor

Norem

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and PSYC 212.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 313R Research Methods in Abnormal Psychology

An introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of abnormal psychology. Topics will include affective and personality disorders, substance abuse, and stressful life events. Individual and group projects. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students.

Instructor

Theran

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 or PSYC 213. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 324R [2009-10].

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 314R Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology

Introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of human cognition (i.e., how people take in, interpret, organize, remember, and use information in their daily lives). Individual and group projects. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students.

Instructor

Keane

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and one of the following: PSYC 214, PSYC 215, PSYC 216, PSYC 217, PSYC 218, PSYC 219.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 316 Seminar. Language Acquisition

Children around the world acquire their first language, spoken or signed, with seemingly little effort. By the end of their first year, they are saying their first words, and a mere two years later they are speaking in full sentences! We will discuss the various factors that play into children's rapid acquisition of their first language. Toward figuring out how children learn language, we will talk about early speech perception, word learning, the acquisition of phonology, morphology, syntax, and pragmatic knowledge. In addition, we will cover topics such as language development disorders (e.g., autism), the critical period hypothesis, sign language, bilingualism, and language and thought. Over the course of the semester, we will understand the empirical methods that guide the study of child language.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, including PSYC 207 and excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor. LING 114 may be substituted for either 200-level unit.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 318 Seminar. Psychopharmacology

Topics include principles and mechanisms underlying action of drugs, major neurotransmitter systems, major classes of psychoactive drugs, and psychological disorders and medications.

Instructor

Deveney

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, including either PSYC 219 or NEUR 200, and excluding PSYC 205.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 319 Neuropsychology

An exploration of the neural underpinnings of higher cognitive function based on evidence from individuals with brain damage. Major neuroanatomical systems will be reviewed. Topics include motor and sensory function, attention, memory, language, and hemispheric specialization.

Instructor

Keane

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, including either PSYC 219 or NEUR 200, and excluding PSYC 205.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 321 Community Psychology with Wintersession Applied Research

Examines the sociocultural and developmental aspects of gender-specific instruction for girls and boys. The impact of single-gender public school education on social identity, gender stereotypes, motivation, and academic achievement will be explored. An experiential component will be conducted during Wintersession in partnership with the Office of Public School Choice at the South Carolina Department of Education. Students will collect and analyze classroom-based observational and interview data. During the spring, students will review pertinent research literature and statewide survey data, and reflect on the psychological and public policy implications of differential education.

Instructor

Genero

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken PSYC 205 and two 200-level courses. Application required.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Winter, Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 322 Emotion, Cognition, and the Brain

Emotion-based and cognitive-based processes have traditionally been studied in isolation. Yet in most circumstances, there are interactions between these processes. For example, our mood, or the emotional nature of the information we are processing, can alter the ways in which we attend to, or remember, information. In addition to providing an overview of the methods used in affective and cognitive neuroscience, this course will explore topics including how we use emotions to make decisions, how we regulate our emotional responses, how we decide about the morality of actions, and how we perceive, attend to, and remember emotional experiences. This course also will examine how these processes break down in depression, anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors. Two 200-level units, including PSYC 217, PSYC 218 or PSYC 219 or NEUR 200, and excluding PSYC 205

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 323R Research Methods in the Psychology of Human Sexuality

An introduction to research methods appropriate to the study of individual and group differences in sexual attitudes and behavior. Student projects use archival and new survey data to investigate topics such as sexual motivation and attraction, sexual self-esteem and identity, intimacy in romantic relationships, and gender and cultural differences in sexuality. Laboratory. Each section typically limited to 10 students.

Prerequisites

PSYC 205 and PSYC 208 or PSYC 219. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 327.

Unit(s)

1.25

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 326 Seminar. Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Description, etiology, and developmental patterns of behavior problems of children, adolescents, and their families. Topics include theories of child and adolescent psychopathology, externalizing problems such as conduct disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, internalizing problems such as depression, anxiety, and children's experiences of trauma, and developmental disorders such as mental retardation, risk and protective factors for child psychopathology, and child and family interventions.

Instructor

Theran

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 327 Seminar. Psychology of Human Sexuality

An examination of psychological approaches to individual and group differences in sexual attitudes and behavior. This course draws upon theory and research from the fields of personality psychology and social psychology. Topics include: sexual motivation and attraction; sexual self-esteem and identity; intimacy in romantic relationships; and gender and cultural differences in sexuality.

Instructor

Cheek

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 323R.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Summer I

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 328 Seminar. Genes, Brains, and Human Variation

Why do some people have a keen memory for names or faces, a great sense of direction, or a remarkable ability to do two things at once? And why are some people only average (or even below average) in these areas? We will critically evaluate a broad range of perceptual and cognitive abilities (and disabilities) by drawing upon the fields of cognitive neuroscience, behavioral genetics, development, and human variation. We will address three kinds of question: What broad combination of nature and nurture, and what specific genes and experiences, contribute to differing abilities? What are the neural and cognitive bases of such abilities? And how can we or should we apply such knowledge to ourselves, our families, our communities, and our countries?

Instructor

Wilmer

Prerequisites

Two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, one of which should be PSYC 214, PSYC 215, PSYC 216, PSYC 217, PSYC 218, PSYC 219, or NEUR 200, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 329 Seminar. Psychology of Adulthood and Aging

An examination of how individuals develop and change over the life course. Particular emphasis on experiences associated with entry into adulthood, middle age, and older adulthood. Topics include: age-related changes in personality, emotion, and cognition; work and relationships (including marriage and parenting); life's transitions (e.g., divorce, menopause, and retirement); influence of culture and history on crafting adult lives. Different models of the life course will be discussed.

Instructor

Fay

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 330 Psychology of Law

This course will document biases in jury decisions, inequalities in sentencing, factors that contribute to criminal behavior, and other contemporary research findings in the psychology of law. Students will review research on jury selection, the reliability of eyewitness testimony, factors affecting the perceived innocence or guilt of defendants, the use of hypnosis and lie-detector tests, blaming victims of crime, methods of interrogation, and issues surrounding testimony from children in abuse cases. This course will explore both theory and research on the psychology of law and will include case analyses. A fundamental goal of the course is to allow students to apply their psychological knowledge and critical-thinking skills to the analysis of legal decisions and outcomes.

Instructor

Carli

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 332 Seminar. Personality and Motivation

What do we want, why do want it, and how do we get it? Do we all want the same things? How much control do we have over our own behavior? These questions drive psychologists who study motivation and personality. We will review major perspectives on motivation from personality and social psychology. Within each perspective, we will consider ways in which individual differences at different levels of analysis (e.g., neural networks, hormonal processes, traits, emotional dispositions, family background, social and cultural contexts) are intertwined with motivation and goal pursuit. We will consider ways in which students might apply what psychologists have learned to the pursuit of their personal goals.

Instructor

Norem

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken either PSYC 210 or PSYC 212 and one other 200-level unit, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 333 Clinical and Educational Assessment

Current approaches to the psychological appraisal of individual differences in personality, intelligence, and special abilities will be investigated through the use of cases. Tests included in the survey are MMPI®, CPI®, WAIS®, Rorschach®, and the TAT®. Special emphasis will be placed on test interpretation, report writing, and an understanding of basic psychometric concepts such as validity, reliability, and norms. Useful for students intending to pursue graduate study in clinical, personality, occupational, or school psychology.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 334 Seminar. The Psychology of Creativity

The study of the psychology of creativity is an exciting and ever-growing area of investigation. While the creative process often appears to be mysterious and outside of our conscious control, creative behavior is something that can be examined, quantified, and fostered. In this seminar, we will explore creativity at the individual, group, societal, and cultural levels. Our readings will combine many of the "classics" in the field with cutting-edge empirical studies of creativity in educational, business, and design settings. In addition to doing a substantial amount of reading and writing, each class member will choose a research topic to investigate as well as a semester-long personalized creativity project.

Instructor

Hennessey

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 337 Seminar. Prejudice and Discrimination

A discussion-based examination of social psychological theory and research on prejudice and discrimination with applications to current social issues. Topics include racism, sexism, heterosexism, ageism, and many other forms of intergroup bias, with an emphasis on the psychological mechanisms that underlie all prejudices. We will address two primary questions: Why do people have prejudices? What factors may reduce intergroup bias?

Instructor

Bahns

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level courses, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 338 Social Influence

This course focuses on a major topic in social psychology: attitude formation and change. Techniques of social influence that we encounter in everyday life will be explored, with a particular emphasis on advertising. The findings of empirical research and theory will be used to understand persuasive messages. Topics include how emotion, gender, and culture are used to maximize the effectiveness of advertisements, and how stereotypes are both perpetuated and refuted in advertising.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken PSYC 210 and one other 200-level unit, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 339 Seminar. Narrative Identity

Narrative psychology explores the human propensity to create and use stories about significant figures and events in the process of identity formation. Topics will include an exploration of mermaids and related figures as cultural images, metaphors for personal transformation, and archetypal symbols of the collective unconscious. The Little Mermaid and La Sirene of Haitian Vodou will be examined as representations of men's fear of, and attempts to control, women's spirituality and sexuality. The personality theories of Jung and Reich provide the framework for the seminar.

Instructor

Cheek

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 340 Organizational Psychology

An examination of key topics, such as social environment of the work place, motivation and morale, change and conflict, quality of worklife, work group dynamics, leadership, culture, and the impact of workforce demographics (gender, race, socioeconomic status). Experiential activities, cases, theory, and research.

Instructor

Carli

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 341 Seminar. Psychology of Shyness

An examination of psychological approaches to understanding shyness and the related self-conscious emotions of embarrassment and shame. Topics include: genetics of shyness, evolutionary perspectives on shyness in animals, adolescent self-consciousness, and individual and group differences in social behavior.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level courses, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 342 Seminar. Psychology of Optimism and Pessimism

An examination of the ways in which expectations influence and are influenced by thoughts, feelings, motivation, and behavior. There are a variety of psychological constructs that fall under the general rubric of optimism and pessimism, and research has shown that they relate to physical and mental health, achievement, personal relationships, and even longevity. This seminar will explore those relationships, with an emphasis on understanding both the costs and the benefits of personal and cultural optimism and pessimism.

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken PSYC 212 or PSYC 210 and one other 200-level course, excluding PSYC 205.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 343 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Psychology in the Public Interest

The primary goal of this course is to develop skills for communicating complex and technical information about human psychology and a psychological perspective to nonexperts. Students will learn to communicate psychological theories (as well as the empirical evidence and methods that support them) to the public through a set of varied writing assignments. These assignments will require students to take a step back from the details of their course work in psychology to think about how the major has shaped their understanding of human biological and social processes. Assignments may include interviews of research psychologists, observations of behavior, book reviews, evaluation of journal articles, and coverage of public talks related to psychological topics. Class sessions will be conducted as workshops devoted to analyzing and critiquing the presentation of psychological information in expository writing.

Instructor

Gleason

Prerequisites

Open to junior and senior psychology majors who have taken two 200-level courses, excluding PSYC 205, or permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 344 Seminar. Social Imagination

An examination of the uses and types of imagination in both childhood and adulthood. This course will touch on the mechanics of mental imagery and discuss the ways in which imagery is manifest in cognition and particularly in management of social relationships. Emphasis will be placed on the connections between imagination and emotion, such as in children's enactment of scary or nurturant pretend play. How imagination affects interpersonal interactions will be considered, as will other topics such as children's creation of imaginary companions, imagination as pathology, and individual differences in imagination, imagery of individuals deprived of particular senses, and the influence of imagination on memory.

Instructor

Gleason

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level courses, excluding PSYC 205.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA, EC

PSYC 345-01-S Seminar. Selected Topics in Developmental Psychology

Topic for 2013-14: Language and the Development of Autobiographical Memory

Most adults have limited memories from their childhood and almost no memories from before the age of 3. Students will learn about the factors that influence this phenomenon of 'childhood amnesia' and the course of autobiographical memory development in children. The topic of language features heavily in this course, as language and autobiographical memory are inextricably linked. We will discuss how the language that parents use to reminisce with children influences autobiographical memory development. Additional topics include: language, autobiographical memory and gender, broader societal and cultural influences on memory, atypical language development and its effect on autobiographical memory, and bilingualism and autobiographical memory.

Instructor

Steiner

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken PSYC 207 and one other 200-level course, excluding PSYC 205.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Spring

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 349 Seminar. Nonverbal Communication

An examination of the use of nonverbal communication in social interactions. Systematic observation of nonverbal behavior, especially facial expression, tone of voice, gestures, personal space, and body movement. Readings include scientific studies and descriptive accounts. Issues include: the communication of emotion; cultural and gender differences; the detection of deception; the impact of nonverbal cues on impression formation; nonverbal communication in specific settings (e.g., counseling, education, interpersonal relationships).

Prerequisites

Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two 200-level units, excluding PSYC 205.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Not Offered

Degree Requirements

SBA

PSYC 350 Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

PSYC 350H Research or Individual Study

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Unit(s)

0.5

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

PSYC 360 Senior Thesis Research

Prerequisites

Permission of the department.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None

PSYC 370 Senior Thesis

Prerequisites

PSYC 360 and permission of the department.

Unit(s)

1.0

Semesters Offered

Fall, Spring

Degree Requirements

None
RELATED

Departments and Programs